Competition Requirements for

Aircraft Maintenance

​Aircraft maintenance Engineers (AMEs) carry out maintenance and repairs on aeroplanes, helicopters and drones civil, military and public service operators.  While workshops and hangars are used for complex maintenance a large portion of an AME’s work will take place on the aircraft outside in the weather.

Aircraft Maintenance is an exacting role and AMEs work to stringent international safety standards and maintain aircraft strictly within the manufacturer’s specifications. 

Our main purpose is to keep the aircraft serviceable and fit for flight because the safety and wellbeing of passengers and crew is paramount.  The work we do can include; inspections, servicing tasks such as refuelling and cleaning, troubleshooting faults, maintaining aircraft systems and overhauling components.  These tasks can be carried out on the aircraft structure, engines, or systems like hydraulics, fuel, undercarriages and electrical.  When troubleshooting faults we also have to look wider than the obvious problem as most aircraft systems are integrated with each other so AMEs need a good knowledge of aircraft systems and technology.  We need to continuously upgrade our knowledge and skills as technology advances occur constantly in aviation. 

Aircraft maintenance is part of a global industry and it provides a wide range of rewarding opportunities for an enterprising AME.  WorldSkills competitions have shown that New Zealand AMEs can perform up there with the best in the world.

 

The NZ Skill Manager for Aircraft Maintenance is Michael Naus. 
Employer: New Zealand Defence Force.

Michael trained and worked in the Air Force as an AME mainly on helicopters and then moved into training roles within Defence and now works with military apprentices.  Michael has been the skill manager since NZ started competing in Aircraft Maintenance in 2012 and is now the chief judge at the international competition.

WorldSkills competition provides apprentices and tradespeople the opportunity to push themselves to do something extra within the framework of their day job.  Kiwis know how to adapt and get on with the job and WS Competition is just an extension of this to let competitors prove that not only can they do the job but can also excel at it.  To World standard in fact. 

In a competition I advise my competitors to just think of the test project as another job at work, ignore what’s going on around you and plan the job, execute the plan and re-plan if needed to finish the job. 

The NZ Skill Manager for Aircraft Maintenance is Michael Naus.
Employer: New Zealand Defence Force.

Michael trained and worked in the Air Force as an AME mainly on helicopters and then moved into training roles within Defence and now works with military apprentices.  Michael has been the skill manager since NZ started competing in Aircraft Maintenance in 2012 and is now the chief judge at the international competition.

WorldSkills competition provides apprentices and tradespeople the opportunity to push themselves to do something extra within the framework of their day job.  Kiwis know how to adapt and get on with the job and WS Competition is just an extension of this to let competitors prove that not only can they do the job but can also excel at it.  To World standard in fact.

In a competition I advise my competitors to just think of the test project as another job at work, ignore what’s going on around you and plan the job, execute the plan and re-plan if needed to finish the job.

Got a question, ask Michael:

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